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Indonesian Fruit Pisang

Indonesian Fruit Pisang, Card-Board, 345 x 425, RP. 279,000    

$ 20

Mappe Monde c.1724

Decorative world map by the great French cartographer Guillaume Delisle (1675-1726), one of the key figures in the development of French cartography who believed passionately in the importance of accuracy. This twin-hemispheric map was originally published by Delisle in 1724 in his “Atlas Nouveau”.The map shows the routes of a number of the world’s major explorers: Magellan (1520), Le Maire (1615), St. Louis (1708), Halley (1700), Mendana (1595), St. Antoine (1710), Tasman (1642) and Quiroz (1605).

Size image: 64 cm x 44 cm

$ 36

KLM Airlines 1934 Poster

Decorative poster of KLM’s 1934 flight schedule and route map from Amsterdam to Batavia , a 14.350 km long route. KLM proudly advertised that it took five and a half days to reach the Dutch East Indies. Compared to 6 weeks on a ship it sure made a difference! Shown is a globe presented as if seen from outer space, a starlit sky fills in the spaces around the globe which shows the route map. The aircraft shown is a Fokker F-XXXVI.

size image: 62 cm x 89 cm (canvas)

$ 62

Balinese Dancer

Highly decorative movie poster of the 1937 German movie “Die Insel der Dämonen” (Island of demons) by Franz Würbel.

size image: 44 cm x 69 cm (M) or 75 cm x 115 cm (L, on canvas)

$ 50

A New Chart of the Java Sea c.1794

This is an edited reproduction of a map originally published in 1794 by Laurie and Whittle of London in ‘The East India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator, on One Hundred and Eighteen Plates: Containing a Complete Collection of Charts and Plans’. In line with other sea charts of this period there is very little information about the inland areas. For merchants the seas and coastal cities were all that mattered.

Size image: 34 cm x 93 cm

$ 46

Bali c.1724

Attractive large-scale map of the island of Bali, originally published in Amsterdam by Francois Valentyn in his “Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien” ( 1724-26 ), and based on the earlier map of Bali compiled by Willem Lodewijcksz, a member of Cornelius de Houtman’s pioneering voyage to the East Indies in 1595-97.

Size image: 56 cm x 45 cm (printed on canvas)

$ 36

Map of the World c.1685

Attractive late 17th century map of the world, originally published by the famous Dutch cartographer and publisher Nicolaes Visscher. This iconic map is regarded as the master forerunner of a number of highly decorative Dutch world maps produced throughout the remainder of the century. Distinctive attractiveness found in the border decorations showing dramatical classical scenes representing “the rape of Persephone”, “Zeus being carried across the heavens in an eagle-drawn chariot”, “Poseidon commanding his entourage”, and “Demeter receiving the fruits of the Earth”.This highly decorative piece of art includes a set of smaller polar hemispheric projections at the top and bottom of the map.

size image: 48 cm x 40 cm

$ 35

Bali Hotel Denpasar 1

One of the posters of Bali Hotel ‘Charming Bali’ by Hofker, 1948.

The first step of organized tourism in Balinese history was made in 1924 when the Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij (KPM) established a weekly steamship route between Bali and Batavia (Jakarta), Singapore, Semarang, Surabaya and Makassar. The first tourists were from the Dutch colonial administration. The schedule was that the passengers disembarked on a Friday morning, made a round trip on the island by car and left on Sunday. They slept on the ship or in rest houses. Four years later, in 1928, the first international hotel in Bali was opened by the Dutch shipping company KPM: the Bali Hotel in downtown Denpasar, built on the site of the 1906 Badung puputan. Today the hotel still exists, holding a different name: Inna Bali Hotel.

size : 63 cm x 43 cm (S)  –  82,5 cm x 56 cm (M)  –  109 cm x 73,5 cm (L)

Printed on canvas – vinyl.

$ 18

Sea chart of the East Indies c.1666

A fine mid-17th century Dutch sea chart of South-East Asia and Australia by Pieter Goos (1615-1675), noted engraver and publisher of Amsterdam. This interesting map was originally published in the sea atlas ‘De Zee Atlas ofte Water-Weereld’ (The Sea Atlas or the Water World). The chart is oriented with north to the left and shows the result of Abel Tasman’s second voyage. There is a gap in the coastline between Australia (called New Holland) and New Guinea while the two are connected on most other maps of this period.

 

Size: 48 cm x 40 cm

$ 36

India Orientalis c.1724

Early 18th century map of Australia, Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean, originally from Valentyn’s Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien, one of the earliest contemporary maps to report information drawn from the Dutch V.O.C. during the period. This excellent map details the Middle East, the Indian Ocean, the Far East, and much of Australia, based on careful compilation of the best available sources by the brilliant and entertaining Dutch chronicler, François Valentijn. The map features a fine depiction of the outlines of the western two-thirds of Australia, based on the discoveries of explorers working for the Dutch East India Company (the VOC). These include Willem Jansz’s discoveries in the Gulf of Carpentaria in 1606; the encounters of Dirk Hartog in 1616, the crew of the Leeuwin in 1622, Gerrit Frederiksz de Witt in 1627, and Pieter Nuyts in 1627, in Western Australia; and Jan Cartensz and Willem van Colster’s discoveries in Northern Australia in 1623. The Indonesian Archipelago is well-formed based on VOC knowledge, except that the shape of New Guinea still remains ambiguous. The Philippines are shown in the configuration utilized prior to the publication of Padre Pedro Murillo Velarde’s map in 1744. Continental Southeast Asia assumes a refined form, and includes the intelligence gathered by the French embassy to Siam, made shortly before Western contact with the kingdom was cut-off in 1688. Further north in Asia, the coasts of China are relatively well formed, based on Jesuit surveys, most notably those conducted by Martino Martini in the 1640s and 1650s. Korea is correctly shown as a peninsula, albeit of a somewhat nebulous form. Notably, Valentijn does not incorporate and was likely unaware of the groundbreaking surveys of China and Korea contained in the Chinese Kangxi Atlas (1718-9), which was yet to reach Europe. The southern main islands of Japan are relatively well formed, based on the charting of VOC mariners operating out of Nagasaki. The coasts of India, Arabia and Africa are conveyed in a progressive manner, based on extensive navigational experience and innumerable surveys conducted by the Portuguese and the Dutch. Notably, ‘I. St. Maria’ (St. Mary’s Island) on Madagascar was then the pirate capital of the World and a place to be avoided by ‘legitimate’ mariners. Notably, the map features highly advanced detail with respect to the interior of southern India, based on the work of the French Jesuit Jean-Venant Bouchet (1655-1732), who was the first European to extensively map the Deccan. In 1719, he sent a manuscript map to Paris, which was first published in 1722. Valentijn’s inclusion of this information is therefore quite early.

 

$ 35

Bali Hotel Denpasar 2

One of the posters of Bali Hotel ‘Charming and Beautiful Bali’ by Hofker, 1948.

The first step of organized tourism in Balinese history was made in 1924 when the Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij (KPM) established a weekly steamship route between Bali and Batavia (Jakarta), Singapore, Semarang, Surabaya and Makassar. The first tourists were from the Dutch colonial administration. The schedule was that the passengers disembarked on a Friday morning, made a round trip on the island by car and left on Sunday. They slept on the ship or in rest houses. Four years later, in 1928, the first international hotel in Bali was opened by the Dutch shipping company KPM: the Bali Hotel in downtown Denpasar, built on the site of the 1906 Badung puputan. Today the hotel still exists, holding a different name: Inna Bali Hotel.

size : 63 cm x 43 cm (S)  –  82,5 cm x 56 cm (M)  –  109 cm x 73,5 cm (L)

Printed on canvas – vinyl.

$ 18

Exhibition Semarang 1914

Poster by Dutch artist Albert Pieter Hahn advertising the colonial exhibition in Semarang in 1914. The exhibition in 1914 was the biggest art event ever held in Indonesia and was even included as one of the 10 World Expo’s (World Fair). The image depicts a Javanese bride wearing traditional costume.

size image: 41 cm x 64 cm (M) or 76 cm x 115 cm (L, on canvas)

$ 50

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