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2 sheet Java Sea Chart c.1720

Rp 950,000

This attractive map of Java and Madura by Gerard van Keulen was originally published around 1720 in part V of ‘Zee-Fakkel’, the beautiful Dutch pilot guide to navigation in the East Indies and the Malay archipelago. The map contains hundreds of soundings of the sea around Java.

This map consists of two separate sheets (framed in one frame). Available in luxury framing (small inner frames, cloth and an outer frame) or normal framing.

size images: 46 cm x 40 cm

3 sheet Java map c.1818

Rp 1,750,000

3 sheet Java map c.1818

Rp 1,750,000

Attractive early 19th century (1818) Dutch map of Java, originally by JS van den Bosch (1780 – 1844), Major General, Knight of the 3rd Class of the Military William Order. Engraved by J. C Visser and produced by the Brothers van Cleef of the Hague and Amsterdam. One of 12 maps from Atlas van Overzeesche bezittingen [Atlas of Oversea Possessions] 1818.

This map is only available on high quality fine art bamboo paper.

A New Chart of the Java Sea c.1794

Rp 650,000

This is an edited reproduction of a map originally published in 1794 by Laurie and Whittle of London in ‘The East India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator, on One Hundred and Eighteen Plates: Containing a Complete Collection of Charts and Plans’. In line with other sea charts of this period there is very little information about the inland areas. For merchants the seas and coastal cities were all that mattered.

Size image: 34 cm x 93 cm

A New Chart of the Java Sea c.1794

Rp 550,000

Reproduction of A New Chart of the Java Sea, Whitin the Isles of Sunda; with its Straits and the Adjecent Seas, originally published in 1794 by Laurie and Whittle of London in ‘The East India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator, on One Hundred and Eighteen Plates: Containing a Complete Collection of Charts and Plans’. In line with other sea charts of this period there is very little information about the inland areas. For merchants the seas and coastal cities were all that mattered.

Size image: 58 cm x 40 cm (M) or 86 cm x 58 cm (L, original size printed on canvas)

Air France World Map c.1938

Rp 480,000

Double hemisphere world map by Lucien Boucher showing Air France flying routes in the late 1940s.

size image: 64 cm x 39 cm (M) or 108 cm x 66 cm (L, printed on canvas)

Asia c.1604

Rp 480,000

Asia c.1604

Rp 480,000

Reproduction of a rare early 17th century map of Asia by the great Dutch engraver and map publisher Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), who worked with many of the most prominent cartographers and publishers of maps at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century. In 1604 he bought the plates of Mercator’s Atlas which, in spite of its excellence, had not competed successfully with Abraham Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. In order to meet this competition Hondius added 37 new maps including one of the Asian continent and from 1606 published enlarged editions of the so-called Mercator/Hondius Atlas Sive Cosmographicae mediations de fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figura. The new general delineation of Asia was to become the standard delineation of the region for the next 20 years. Hondius included a number of updates on the map with Korea being shown as an island and Japan is shown as three principal islands. The geography of the East Indian Islands is based on the Portuguese sources revealed in Linschoten’s Itinerario (1596) and Theodore De Bry’s Petit Voyages (1598-99). Java is shown with an incomplete southern coastline and New Guinea, which is marked with Spanish place names following, has an accompanying note in Latin stating; “Whether this is an island or part of the continent of Terra Australia has not yet been identified.”

Size: 53 cm x 40 cm

Bali c.1724

Rp 500,000

Bali c.1724

Rp 500,000

Attractive large-scale map of the island of Bali, originally published in Amsterdam by Francois Valentyn in his “Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien” ( 1724-26 ), and based on the earlier map of Bali compiled by Willem Lodewijcksz, a member of Cornelius de Houtman’s pioneering voyage to the East Indies in 1595-97.

Size image: 56 cm x 45 cm (printed on canvas)

Bali Hotel Denpasar

Rp 500,000

Bali Hotel Denpasar

Rp 500,000

The first step of organized tourism in Balinese history was made in 1924 when the Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij (KPM) established a weekly steamship route between Bali and Batavia (Jakarta), Singapore, Semarang, Surabaya and Makassar. The first tourists were from the Dutch colonial administration. The schedule was that the passengers disembarked on a Friday morning, made a round trip on the island by car and left on Sunday. They slept on the ship or in rest houses. Four years later, in 1928, the first international hotel in Bali was opened by the Dutch shipping company KPM: the Bali Hotel in downtown Denpasar, built on the site of the 1906 Badung puputan. Today the hotel still exists, holding a different name: Inna Bali Hotel.

size image: 44 cm x 69 cm

 

Bali Poster

Rp 500,000

Bali Poster

Rp 500,000

Highly decorative Bali poster, based on the original Bali Hotel poster by Willem Gerard Hofker.

size image: 44 cm x 69 cm

 

Balinese Dancer

Rp 500,000

Balinese Dancer

Rp 500,000

Highly decorative movie poster of the 1937 German movie “Die Insel der Dämonen” (Island of demons) by Franz Würbel.

size image: 44 cm x 69 cm (M) or 75 cm x 115 cm (L, on canvas)

Balinese Girl in Aquatint A

Rp 225,000

1947 etching of a Balinese girl by Dutch artist Willem Gerard Hofker (1902-1981).

size image: 18 cm x 25 cm

Balinese Girl in Aquatint B

Rp 225,000

1947 etching of a Balinese girl by Dutch artist Willem Gerard Hofker (1902-1981).

size image: 18 cm x 25 cm