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Map of Abel Tasman’s 1ste voyage c.1726

Mid-18th century map showing the route taken by Abel Tasman on his way to discovering New Zealand, Tasmania, Tonga and Fiji. The map was originally published by Francois Valentyn in his ‘Oud en Nieuw Oost Indien’ (Old and New East Indies). Tasman started his voyage in Mauritius and left Batavia on August 14th 1642, commanded by the VOC, to determine whether the already discovered (north)west Australian coasts were connected with the hypothetical southern continent. The results of Tasman’s second voyage of 1644 are not included in this map.

size image: 47 cm x 31 cm

$ 36

South East Asia c.1635

The famous early 17th century map of South-East Asia by the great Dutch cartographer William Blaeu. The original map was first published in the two-volume “Nieuwe Atlas” in 1635, showing India and Japan in the north, and New Guinea and partial sections of the coast of Australia in the south, with attractive cartouches for the title of this wonderful map. As the official cartographer to the VOC Blaeu had access to the most up-to-date information, although he is known to have supressed knowledge of Australia for thirty years. “one of the most detailed images of the sphere of operations and Asian trading empire of the Dutch East India Company”.

Size image: 40 cm x 49 cm

$ 36

Two Bali Girls Offering

Two Bali Girls Offering, Card-board with coloured passe-partout.  345 mm width x 425 mm height,  IDR. 279.000

$ 20

Dieng Plateau C.1853

Reproduction of a lithograph by Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, showing a marshy plateau in the Dieng volcanic complex, located in Central Java. On the left is one of the Dieng temples. The original lithograph was published in Junghuhn’s Landschaften-Atlas zu Java, Amsterdam 1850-1854.

size : 54 cm x 39 cm (S)  –  70,5 cm x 50,5 cm (M)  –  93,4 cm x 66,7 cm (L)

Printed on canvas – vinyl.

$ 14

Bali Hotel Denpasar

The first step of organized tourism in Balinese history was made in 1924 when the Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij (KPM) established a weekly steamship route between Bali and Batavia (Jakarta), Singapore, Semarang, Surabaya and Makassar. The first tourists were from the Dutch colonial administration. The schedule was that the passengers disembarked on a Friday morning, made a round trip on the island by car and left on Sunday. They slept on the ship or in rest houses. Four years later, in 1928, the first international hotel in Bali was opened by the Dutch shipping company KPM: the Bali Hotel in downtown Denpasar, built on the site of the 1906 Badung puputan. Today the hotel still exists, holding a different name: Inna Bali Hotel.

size image: 44 cm x 69 cm

 

$ 36

Taprobana Insula c.1540

Taprobana as shown by the German geographer, cartographer and theologian Sebastian Munster. On some maps of the period Taprobana is depicted as Ceylon (Sri Lanka), and on others as the much larger island of Sumatra. In this particular instance Taprobana has the equator running through the southern part of the island and therefore cannot represent Ceylon which lies north of the equator. The position of the equator and the location to the south-west of ‘Pars Indiae’ suggests Sumatra Island. The name, shape and position of the island in the Indian ocean is derived from an earlier world map of Ptolemy contained in a 15th century (pre-1470) manuscript and represents a vestige of the mythical islands of Ptolemy’s land-locked Indian Ocean (Mare Indicum). The cartouche contains an old Gothic text referring to Taprobana and Sumatra and the commodities available on the island including pepper, one of the major spices produced in Sumatra. The map was probably published in Münster’s Geographia Universalis in 1540.

Size image: 34 cm x 25 cm

 

$ 36

Greater Bird of Paradise

A fine reprint of the Greater Bird of Paradise by Eduard Travies, one of the greatest ornithological artists of the 19th century, published in his finest work ‘Les Oiseaux Les Plus Remarquables. ’The Great Bird of Paradise is the largest most spectacular member of a family of 40 species grouped under the name Paradiseidae.

size image: 51 cm x 38 cm

$ 48

Sumatra c.1724

An early 18th century map of Sumatra and the southern part of the Malay peninsula in modern outline colour by Francois Valentyn is from his eight-volume history of the East Indies entitled Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien that was published in Amsterdam by Gerard Onder de Linden and the bookseller Joannes van Bram between 1724 and 1726. The work contained numerous charts of the major islands including this large map of Sumatra oriented with east at the top.

Size image: 51 cm x 60 cm (printed on canvas)

$ 40

City Plan of Batavia c.1681

This map of Batavia, nowadays Jakarta, was originally published by the Italian historian Gregorio Leti (1630-1710) and was based on the earlier map of Batavia published by Clement de Jonghe in 1650. At the bottom of the map is a view of the city from the sea: for most people this was the first glimpse of the city, after a long sailing journey. Shown are a few Dutch large size sailing vessels, the old Dutch Castle, the canals and the old city walls.

size : 53,5 cm x 43,5 cm (S) – 70 cm x 57 cm (M) – 93 cm x 76 cm (L)

Printed on canvas – vinyl

$ 15

2 sheet Java Sea Chart c.1720

This attractive map of Java and Madura by Gerard van Keulen was originally published around 1720 in part V of ‘Zee-Fakkel’, the beautiful Dutch pilot guide to navigation in the East Indies and the Malay archipelago. The map contains hundreds of soundings of the sea around Java.

This map consists of two separate sheets (framed in one frame). Available in luxury framing (small inner frames, cloth and an outer frame) or normal framing.

size images: 46 cm x 40 cm

$ 125

Asia c.1604

Reproduction of a rare early 17th century map of Asia by the great Dutch engraver and map publisher Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), who worked with many of the most prominent cartographers and publishers of maps at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century. In 1604 he bought the plates of Mercator’s Atlas which, in spite of its excellence, had not competed successfully with Abraham Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. In order to meet this competition Hondius added 37 new maps including one of the Asian continent and from 1606 published enlarged editions of the so-called Mercator/Hondius Atlas Sive Cosmographicae mediations de fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figura. The new general delineation of Asia was to become the standard delineation of the region for the next 20 years. Hondius included a number of updates on the map with Korea being shown as an island and Japan is shown as three principal islands. The geography of the East Indian Islands is based on the Portuguese sources revealed in Linschoten’s Itinerario (1596) and Theodore De Bry’s Petit Voyages (1598-99). Java is shown with an incomplete southern coastline and New Guinea, which is marked with Spanish place names following, has an accompanying note in Latin stating; “Whether this is an island or part of the continent of Terra Australia has not yet been identified.”

Size: 53 cm x 40 cm
$ 36

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